Bridal wreath spirea


Bridal wreath spirea produces the loveliest arched boughs of highly scented flowers. In early to mid-spring, this perennial shrub produces clusters of tiny flower head blooms on cascading stems, looking much like a bride's bouquet. Shown below, bridal wreath spirea drapes over azalea.


Planting spirea

Plant spirea in early fall or early spring in a sunny to partial shade location. Bridal wreath spirea has the potential to grow 10 feet tall and wide if not pruned, making it a great choice as a privacy fence. To create a privacy fence, set plant about 8 feet apart.
flowering shrubs
Dig the hole for the shrub twice as wide as the root ball (plant container). Dig the hole as deep as the root ball in tall. Remove the shrub from the container and place it in the center of the hole. The top of the root ball should be level with the surrounding ground. Back fill the hole with the soil removed from the hole. Water deeply. Spread 3 to 4 inches of mulch, like pine chips or leaf mold, around the shrub to hold in moisture and help block weed growth.

Care

If planting in the fall, water about every 10 days if there is no rainfall and then stop watering at the first hard freeze. In the spring the following year, and if planting in the spring, if there is no rainfall, water every two weeks in spring and fall. Water more frequently in the summer, which may mean watering every seven to 10 days. The following year, rainfall alone should be enough.

Use hedge clippers to prune bridal wreath spirea to retain a desired shape. Cut back up to one-third of the shrub after it finishes blooming. If bridal wreath spirea becomes overgrown, cut to about 6 inches above ground.

Why didn't my spirea bloom?

Spirea grows quickly though may not bloom the first year after a severe pruning. The shrub may not bloom the first year it is planted or transplanted. Buds set in early spring. A late hard freeze could kill the buds, leaving the shrub with no blooms. The shrub will recover from pruning, transplanting and hard freeze to bloom the following year.

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